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Posts tagged "til art do us part"

Jul 29, 2014
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The woman who helped make Star Wars and Indiana Jones

Ever heard of editor Marcia Lucas? There’s a long, fascinating history of her life over at The Secret History of Star Wars:

Biographer Dale Pollock once wrote that Marcia was George Lucas’ “secret weapon.” Most people are aware that George Lucas was once married, and probably some are aware that his wife worked in the film industry herself and edited all of George’s early films before their 1983 divorce. But few are aware of the implications that her presence brought, and the transformations her departure allowed. She was, in many ways, more than just the supportive wife—she was a partner as well. “Not a fifty percent partner,” as she herself admits, but nonetheless an important one, and the only person that Lucas could totally confide in back then. Today, she has been practically erased from the history books at Lucasfilm.

Mark Hamill (a.k.a. Luke Skywalker) says Marcia was the “warmth and heart” of STAR WARS, and points to a radical shift in George Lucas’s filmmaking after their divorce:

[George is] in his own world. He’s like William Randolph Hearst or Howard Hughes, he’s created his own world and he can live in it all the time. You really see that in his films, he’s completely cut off from the rest of world. You can see a huge difference in the films that he does now and the films that he did when he was married. I know for a fact that Marcia Lucas was responsible for convincing him to keep that little “kiss for luck” before Carrie [Fisher] and I swing across the chasm in the first film: “Oh, I don’t like it, people laugh in the previews,” and she said, “George, they’re laughing because it’s so sweet and unexpected”—and her influence was such that if she wanted to keep it, it was in. When the little mouse robot comes up when Harrison and I are delivering Chewbacca to the prison and he roars at it and it screams, sort of, and runs away, George wanted to cut that and Marcia insisted that he keep it. She was really the warmth and the heart of those films, a good person he could talk to, bounce ideas off of, who would tell him when he was wrong. Now he’s so exalted that no one tells him anything.

Marcia, who was always pushing George to focus on story and character, also provided a crucial woman’s perspective to Raiders of The Lost Ark:

[Marcia] was instrumental in changing the ending of Raiders, in which Indiana delivers the ark to Washington. Marion is nowhere to be seen, presumably stranded on an island with a submarine and a lot of melted Nazis. Marcia watched the rough cut in silence and then levelled the boom. She said there was no emotional resolution to the ending, because the girl disappears. ‘Everyone was feeling really good until she said that,’ Dunham recalls. ‘It was one of those, “Oh no we lost sight of that.” ’ Spielberg reshot the scene in downtown San Francisco, having Marion wait for Indiana on the steps on the government building. Marcia, once again, had come to the rescue.”

In his recent piece, “Temple of Gloom,” Wesley Morris points to the Lucas’s divorce as a source of the darkness in the Indiana Jones sequel:

Spielberg, who’s two years younger than Lucas, was poleaxed by his friends’ divorce. “George and Marcia, for me, were the reason you got married … ” he told 60 Minutes in 1999. “And when it didn’t work, and when that marriage didn’t work, I lost my faith in marriage for a long time.” Spielberg had his own problems. He’d just split with Kathleen Carey, a girlfriend of three years. A few months earlier, Spielberg had told People, “I think Kathleen and I will have kids.” Suddenly, the two most successful moviemakers on the planet were under-40 bachelors.

And:

“I was going through a divorce,” Lucas said, “and I was in a really bad mood. So I really wanted to do dark. And Steve then broke up with his girlfriend, and so he was sort of into it, too. That’s where we were at that point in time.” That’s the reason Temple of Doom… is difficult for its creators — and lots of Indy fans — to love. It’s a breakup movie. It’s a record of gloomy images that were scrolling through its creators’ heads. “Sometimes,” Lucas told me, “you go to the dark side.” For two bummed-out guys, Temple of Doom was a catalog of what it’s like to get your heart ripped out.

Filed under: George Lucas

Jul 19, 2014
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Robert De Niro, Sr. and Virginia Admiral

Did you know Robert De Niro’s parents were both painters who met in art school?

Wikipedia:


  At [Hans] Hofmann’s summer school, [De Niro] met fellow student Virginia Admiral, whom he married in 1942. The couple moved into a large, airy loft in New York’s Greenwich Village, where they were able to paint. They surrounded themselves with an illustrious circle of friends, including writers Anaïs Nin and Henry Miller, playwright Tennessee Williams, and the actress and famous Berlin dancer Valeska Gert. Admiral and De Niro separated shortly after their son, Robert De Niro, Jr., was born in August 1943.


See also: the documentary Remembering The Artist: Robert De Niro, Sr.

Robert De Niro, Sr. and Virginia Admiral

Did you know Robert De Niro’s parents were both painters who met in art school?

Wikipedia:

At [Hans] Hofmann’s summer school, [De Niro] met fellow student Virginia Admiral, whom he married in 1942. The couple moved into a large, airy loft in New York’s Greenwich Village, where they were able to paint. They surrounded themselves with an illustrious circle of friends, including writers Anaïs Nin and Henry Miller, playwright Tennessee Williams, and the actress and famous Berlin dancer Valeska Gert. Admiral and De Niro separated shortly after their son, Robert De Niro, Jr., was born in August 1943.

See also: the documentary Remembering The Artist: Robert De Niro, Sr.

May 19, 2014
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Calvin Trillin, About Alice

From Peter Stevenson’s review, “Scenes From a Marriage”:

“About Alice” is an unabashed love letter to Trillin’s wife, Alice, who died in 2001 at the age of 63 while awaiting a heart transplant, after a battle with lung cancer 25 years previously had left her heart weakened by radiation.

[…]

When “About Alice” appeared in shorter form in The New Yorker last spring, people couldn’t wait to tell their friends to read it. Trillin had written about a marriage in which neither partner seems to have done any grievous or even subtle harm to the other. It was as if he had traveled out beyond familiar territory and brought back a moon rock, something worthy of preserving.

And you could tell: he and Alice had a ball. Weeks after their first meeting, he pursued her to another party: “At the second party, I did get to talk to her quite a lot. … Recalling that party in later years, Alice would sometimes say, ‘You have never again been as funny as you were that night.’

“ ‘You mean I peaked in December of 1963?’ I’d say, 20 or even 30 years later.

“ ‘I’m afraid so.’ ”

Filed under: marriage

May 01, 2014
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Cy Twombly and his wife, Tatiana Franchetti, in Rome, 1966

They got married in 1959, she died in 2010, and he died a year later. That’s one classy-looking couple. (Photograph by Horst P. Horst for Vogue) More photos of their place, here.

Cy Twombly and his wife, Tatiana Franchetti, in Rome, 1966

They got married in 1959, she died in 2010, and he died a year later. That’s one classy-looking couple. (Photograph by Horst P. Horst for Vogue) More photos of their place, here.

Apr 24, 2013
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Every hipster couple in Austin, Texas owes Paul and Linda McCartney royalties.

Every hipster couple in Austin, Texas owes Paul and Linda McCartney royalties.

Feb 20, 2013
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One of the great under-narrrated pleasures of living: long-term fidelity & love.
George Saunders, on being married for 25 years

Feb 16, 2013
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Hafiz, “The Sun Never Says,” translated by Daniel Ladinsky in The Gift

gwendabond:

No longer Valentine’s Day, but this is too beautiful not to pass on. From the wonderful Stephany at crooked house.

(Kind of a chuckle that the poem has been scanned from the book Everybody Marries The Wrong Person.)

Hafiz, “The Sun Never Says,” translated by Daniel Ladinsky in The Gift

gwendabond:

No longer Valentine’s Day, but this is too beautiful not to pass on. From the wonderful Stephany at crooked house.

(Kind of a chuckle that the poem has been scanned from the book Everybody Marries The Wrong Person.)

Sep 18, 2012
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mattforsythe:

Leo and Sofya

Love this. Asked Matt if he was reading The Wives, but he said he was reading Troyat’s biography of Tolstoy.

mattforsythe:

Leo and Sofya

Love this. Asked Matt if he was reading The Wives, but he said he was reading Troyat’s biography of Tolstoy.

Sep 12, 2012
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Vladimir and Vera Nabokov

Spirit animals.

(via [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7])

Jul 18, 2012
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She is the great fact of my life.
— Roger Ebert, on his wife, Chaz in his memoir, Life Itself
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