TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "tumblr"

Sep 08, 2014
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Fairly reliable method for getting big images off a Tumblr blog

  1. copy the image URL and paste in a browser
  2. replace “_500.jpg” with “_1280.jpg”
  3. enjoy
    read more posts about:
  • tumblr

Aug 12, 2014
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johnmartz:

I have a new Tumblr. It’s about my process and my influences. So: comics, illustration, film, books, writing, and making art. If you like the sorts of things I make, or the sorts of things I used to share on Drawn, you might like it. It’s called The Department of Research and Development.
…

I think that’s what artists do when we collect and share links and images. We’re attempting to map a particular world, and a culture, and a set of values that we see our own efforts belonging to. It’s a way to say, “these are my people.” It’s another reason why providing context and sources to the things we share is so important: I want my culture—my people—to thrive.

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This makes me so happy. Follow John’s new tumblr!

johnmartz:

I have a new Tumblr. It’s about my process and my influences. So: comics, illustration, film, books, writing, and making art. If you like the sorts of things I make, or the sorts of things I used to share on Drawn, you might like it. It’s called The Department of Research and Development.

I think that’s what artists do when we collect and share links and images. We’re attempting to map a particular world, and a culture, and a set of values that we see our own efforts belonging to. It’s a way to say, “these are my people.” It’s another reason why providing context and sources to the things we share is so important: I want my culture—my people—to thrive.

Read More

This makes me so happy. Follow John’s new tumblr!

Jan 28, 2014
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Cloudy Cloud Calculator

‏@brandonnn:


  on april 26th, 2011, i started a 29 (!) page blog dedicated to photos of the same exact cloud: http://cloudycloudcalculator.tumblr.com  (over 200 photos!)


Still so great.

Filed under: clouds

Cloudy Cloud Calculator

‏@brandonnn:

on april 26th, 2011, i started a 29 (!) page blog dedicated to photos of the same exact cloud: http://cloudycloudcalculator.tumblr.com (over 200 photos!)

Still so great.

Filed under: clouds

Dec 04, 2013
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My dashboard is filled with reblogs of hipster food shots, screen captures of TV shows and soft porn, which is all fine, but I feel like I could be getting more value out of Tumblr if I followed more people who use tumblr like you do i. e. sharing stuff they find interesting and adding their thoughts. I hope it's not too much to ask if you could recommend some blogs that fit the description, if you know any? Thanks!

I would be delighted. Here is a by-no-means-complete list of Tumblrs I enjoy that are regularly updated and function the way you describe (I’ve left out great Tumblrs like SlaughterHouse 90210, Fresh Air, and The Paris Review, etc.):

More of What I Like - by my-brother-from-another-mother Mark Larson

more than 95 theses - Alan Jacobs’ commonplace book.

The Near-Sighted Monkey - Lynda Barry’s tumblr that she keeps for the course she teaches.

Blake Gopnik - Every day Blake posts a piece of art and writes about it.

New Speedway Boogie - Andy Weissman posts music he likes and what he likes about it

I want to also add: what you’re describing is what I’d call Old School Blogging, much of which happens OUTSIDE of the little Tumblr kingdom. Check out:

Matt Thomas

Jason Kottke

Tony Fitzpatrick

Maud Newton

Andy Baio

Again, this is an incomplete list, but it’ll get you started.

Jul 26, 2013
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Yeah, I split them in two years ago. My blog is about my work—it almost functions as a portfolio, with new art, events, etc. This tumblr is, as you said, a scrapbook of other people’s stuff. But it’s also a notebook, and a place where I go to form ideas and sort of research in public. For that reason, this Tumblr is probably more interesting than the blog. Funny how that works…

Ask me anything you can’t Google.

Yeah, I split them in two years ago. My blog is about my work—it almost functions as a portfolio, with new art, events, etc. This tumblr is, as you said, a scrapbook of other people’s stuff. But it’s also a notebook, and a place where I go to form ideas and sort of research in public. For that reason, this Tumblr is probably more interesting than the blog. Funny how that works…

Ask me anything you can’t Google.

May 01, 2013
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Filed under: convergences

Filed under: convergences

Mar 13, 2013
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Mar 04, 2013
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Mar 03, 2013
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» Frank Ocean Can Fly - NYTimes.com

Artists don’t usually give satisfying answers to the question of how or why they do what they do, and maybe that’s for the best. Sometimes songs mean more to us when we don’t totally grasp the lyrics. Ocean is acutely aware of this. He knows that, as much as anything, he is selling an idea. “That’s why image is so important,” he said. “That’s why you’ve got to practice brevity when you do interviews like this. I could try to make myself likable to you so you could write a piece that keeps my image in good standing, because I’m still selling this, or I could just say, ‘My art speaks for itself.’ ” He practices brevity in most things. He curates and updates his image on Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr deftly and consistently, but he never overshares. “As a writer, as a creator, I’m giving you my experiences,” he said in the GQ interview. “But just take what I give you. You ain’t got to pry beyond that.” To me, he said, “I don’t know if it’s a shield or whatever, but I want to deflect as much as I can onto my work.”

Ocean’s Tumblr is interesting — I love how he’ll post screenshots of his writing instead of actually posting the writing. (As I’ve said before, pictures of writing often spread around the internet faster than writing itself.)

I like this idea of using Tumblr as something more cryptic than outright confession or revelation. Michael Stipe on his:

It’s not confessional at all. I just like to tunnel. Initially the idea was to present a version of myself that might not be the person that people think they know. So it’s a little bit of a play on my being a public figure for as long as I have been…. It might be a bit of an introduction to the way I visually interpret the world. I work visually, and this is essentially an electronic scrapbook, that’s what tumblr’s good for. You know, it’s like a stamp collection, but everyone’s allowed to cull from each other’s collection.

It reminds me of the old Radiohead websites — they were really great at just giving you these little pieces, and you felt like a detective, trying to piece together some picture of what they were working on…

Maybe Robin Sloan said it best: “Work in public. Reveal nothing.”

Dec 20, 2012
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Taking the animated .gif seriously

I was delighted when @EdwardTufte, the data visualization guru, posted on Twitter about the merits of animated GIFs over video when doing analytic work.

Jonah Weiner in his piece on the “glorious GIF renaissance,” wrote that while animated GIFs might seem like nostalgic, throwback, internet junk food, “they perform distinct functions that other formats can’t.”

One thing the GIF does well is “the money shot,” or “the payoff,” or the “Did you see that?” moment:

There is an appealing economy to these GIFs. They get to the point instantaneously, and at the exact moment when one feels the impulse to rewind and watch the climax again, the loop restarts right where it should. In the two minutes it might take me to load a viral video and watch it in full, I can watch the money shots of 15 different viral videos. Yes, we’re talking about decadent levels of impatience, inanity, and time-wasting here, but GIFs allow us to waste less time online—or, rather, to waste it more efficiently.

Weiner also writes that GIFs are great at “reliving and exulting in shared experiences, where zero setup is needed because a familiarity with context is assumed on the part of viewers.” 

Tufte pointed to this batch of amazing baseball pitches as a perfect use of the medium. (A baseball pitch also contains the two elements above that Weiner wrote about: “the money shot” and a “familiarity with context.”) It got me thinking about ways in which we could use animated GIFs as not just time-wasters, but as explanations or illuminations… (UPDATE: @adamgoucher sent me this fantastic post of animated GIFs showing the physics of World Series baseball swings.)

I was also reminded of this batch of James Brown dance moves where the .gif-maker sampled pieces of a youtube video, added annotations (“funky chicken,” and “The Boogaloo”), and put them into a photoset, providing a fabulous entertainment, yes, but also suddenly giving us a “Small multiples” information display that Tufte is so fond of:

“Small multiples resemble the frames of a movie: a series of graphics, showing the same combination of variables, indexed by changes in another variable.” (pg. 170, The Visual Display of Qualitative Information)

Tufte has said over and over: “To make comparisons, it’s better to have information adjacent in space than stacked in time.” You can stretch this a bit and fit it to the internet, and certainly the Tumblr dashboard. (Witness this animated GIF of a Clayton Cubitt video getting almost 3x as many likes as the original.) Seems like for maximum effect, it’s often better to have information in space period.

UPDATE: my friend @bonitasarita sent me this PBS Off Book video: Animated GIFs: The Birth of a Medium:

GIFs are one of the oldest image formats used on the web. Throughout their history, they have served a huge variety of purposes, from functional to entertainment. Now, 25 years after the first GIF was created, they are experiencing an explosion of interest and innovation that is pushing them into the terrain of art. In this episode of Off Book, we chart their history, explore the hotbed of GIF creativity on Tumblr, and talk to two teams of GIF artists who are evolving the form into powerful new visual experiences.

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