TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "twitter"

Jul 29, 2014
Permalink

Cory Arcangel’s, Working On My Novel

theparisreview:

“It’s the story of what it means to live in a cultural climate that stifles almost every creative impulse, and why it so often seems we should stop trying.”

Dan Piepenbring on Cory Arcangel’s new book, Working on My Novel, a compilation of tweets from people who are putatively at work on novels.

I heard about this idea on Twitter and thought it was stupid, but then I saw images of the book and sort of loved it. (Kind of amazing that Penguin actually published something so minimal and artsy fartsy?) Also this Saul Bellow quote in the post:

I wonder whether there will ever be enough tranquility under modern circumstances to allow our contemporary Wordsworth to recollect anything. I feel that art has something to do with the achievement of stillness in the midst of chaos. A stillness that characterizes prayer, too, and the eye of the storm. I think that art has something to do with an arrest of attention in the midst of distraction. —Saul Bellow, the Art of Fiction No. 37, 1966

May 04, 2014
Permalink
I don’t tweet because I don’t need another creative venue. I don’t need another form for self-expression. I don’t need another way to get my thoughts out to people. I have one. I’m good. But I totally think it’s wonderful for anyone who doesn’t have their own national radio show.
— Ira “I don’t own a radio” Glass with some major levels of DGAF (via @mlarson)

Nov 17, 2013
Permalink
Twitter has the same allure as gaming. It is, essentially, Sentences With Friends.
— Kathryn Schulz, “How Twitter Hijacked My Mind”

(Source: , via explore-blog)

Nov 11, 2013
Permalink

Rob Delaney on how to tweet

Oct 09, 2013
Permalink
Filed under: Louis CK.

Filed under: Louis CK.

Sep 14, 2013
Permalink

“Like many people who complain about the limitations of Twitter, Franzen seems unaware that you can write more than one tweet. If you don’t get everything said in your first tweet, then you can write another one — and another after that! It’s endless, actually! Rather like writing a novel, which, as I understand it, you do one sentence at a time.”—Alan Jacobs

Like many people who complain about the limitations of Twitter, Franzen seems unaware that you can write more than one tweet. If you don’t get everything said in your first tweet, then you can write another one — and another after that! It’s endless, actually! Rather like writing a novel, which, as I understand it, you do one sentence at a time.”
Alan Jacobs

Aug 08, 2013
Permalink

Rob Delaney on workshopping via Twitter

robdelaney:

I love Twitter, as much as you can love a website. It has made me a better writer and brought me amazing career opportunities. That said, it is, for me, primarily a tool. I use it to workshop jokes for standup. On stage I tell the same jokes more than once. Why the fuck wouldn’t I? I want them to be as funny as possible, and the more you workshop them, the richer, more detailed, more economic, and more nuanced they can become. So if a tweet that I wrote a while back bubbles up in my mind again, I will often post it. Just because if it was “powerful” enough to stroll into my consciousness again, it means it’s something I might want to talk about onstage that night. I’m more likely to do that if I tweet it again, either with the same wording or, as is often the case, with different, hopefully funnier wording.

Filed under: Twitter, writing

Jul 03, 2013
Permalink

Mar 12, 2013
Permalink
Adrian Younge Presents the Delfonics

It’s not every day that you listen to an album that can be traced to a single tweet:


  One day on Twitter a little over a year ago, I tweeted the question, ‘Who is better: The Dramatics or The Delfonics?’ and people went back and forth saying who they thought was better, and one guy said, ‘Hey, I know William Hart of The Delfonics.’ I said, ‘Wow, OK.’ And he’s like, ‘Yo, I’m a fan of your music, man. I would love for you and him to do music together.’ To me, it’s always been a dream to do something with The Delfonics, but people say things all the time. It’s Hollywood. So [to] make a long story short, a day later, I’m on the phone with William Hart and we’re speaking for like two hours and then we’re speaking the next day for like two hours, and we hit it off in a way that was just cosmic.

Adrian Younge Presents the Delfonics

It’s not every day that you listen to an album that can be traced to a single tweet:

One day on Twitter a little over a year ago, I tweeted the question, ‘Who is better: The Dramatics or The Delfonics?’ and people went back and forth saying who they thought was better, and one guy said, ‘Hey, I know William Hart of The Delfonics.’ I said, ‘Wow, OK.’ And he’s like, ‘Yo, I’m a fan of your music, man. I would love for you and him to do music together.’ To me, it’s always been a dream to do something with The Delfonics, but people say things all the time. It’s Hollywood. So [to] make a long story short, a day later, I’m on the phone with William Hart and we’re speaking for like two hours and then we’re speaking the next day for like two hours, and we hit it off in a way that was just cosmic.

Feb 01, 2013
Permalink
Following doesn’t mean paying attention. You don’t want numbers… not really. What you want is to follow and be followed by human beings who care about issues you care about. This thing we make together. This thing is about hearts and minds, not eyeballs.
— Jeffrey Zeldman, “Stop chasing followers”
Subscribe to my newsletter and get new art, writing, and interesting links delivered to your inbox every week.