TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about. Ask me anything you can't Google.



Posts tagged "use your hands"

Oct 07, 2014
Permalink

Stevie Nicks: “You want your journals written by hand in a book”

Stevie Nicks hangs out with the ladies in Haim, and when she hears none of them journal (Este says she keeps notes on her phone), Nicks brings out one of her leather journals (see above) and tells them how it’s done:

On the right-hand side of the page you write what happened that day, and on the left-hand side you write poems, so when you have an evening where you’re like, “I’m gonna light all the candles and I’m gonna put the fire on, and I’m gonna go sit at the piano and write,” you can dip into your diaries and instantly find a poem and begin.

Then she tells them why they should write on paper::

“You want your journals written by hand in a book, because someday, if you have daughters — I don’t have daughters, but I have fairy goddaughters, thousands of them — all of these books are gonna go to them, and they’re gonna sit around just like we are now, and they’re gonna read them out loud, and they’re going to be able to know what my life was.” Then, pointedly, to Este: “And they’re not gonna find it in your phone.”

Here’s a clip of her talking about writing from her documentary, In Your Dreams:

Filed under: journaling

May 02, 2014
Permalink
With the advent of computers everything has become more and more conceptual and we’ve lost touch with the realm of the tactile. Calligraphy is a way of getting back in touch…
Jean-Louis Cohen, quoted in this mini-documentary about how French schools teach handwriting

Apr 25, 2014
Permalink
I like to see wet ink. A computer leaves me unable to do what I live for: to find something unexpected.

Aug 02, 2013
Permalink
theparisreview:

A manuscript page from Anita Brookner’s novel Family and Friends.

Lovely. When asked why she decided to write a novel after writing non-fiction, she said she was “literally trying my hand.”

Filed under: handwriting

theparisreview:

A manuscript page from Anita Brookner’s novel Family and Friends.

Lovely. When asked why she decided to write a novel after writing non-fiction, she said she was “literally trying my hand.”

Filed under: handwriting

Dec 20, 2012
Permalink

Nov 23, 2012
Permalink
That machine on my desk is for typing out, not composing.

Sep 22, 2012
Permalink
thenearsightedmonkey:

This semester, The Near-Sighted Monkey is spending a lot of time at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery   hanging around scientists and thinking about how they use their hands and how we use our hands when we are trying to figure something out or explain something.
Does being able to write out a problem by hand have some advantage over typing it onto a screen? What is it? How does it differ?
Says the Near-Sighted Monkey about her first day at WID:
“There are white boards and markers every which way you look on the upper floors of the WID building and they are often covered with what look like long dense sentences — I don’t even know what to call them. Are they formulas?  These sloping rows of hand-written shapes. They are beautiful.  Straightforward un-self conscious calligraphy—-  numbers over letters with tinier numbers next to them and then sudden epsilons and deltas and symbols I’ve never seen before like an equal sign drawn wiggly which I think means “pretty much equals”.
I could watch the people at WID draw their formulas out on white boards all day.
When I told one of the mathematicians I met how surprised I was to find people doing so much writing by hand, he told me he needs a pencil in his hand when he’s thinking. He said most of the mathematicians he knows are the same way. “
How can our hands help us think something out?

Filed under: use your hands

thenearsightedmonkey:

This semester, The Near-Sighted Monkey is spending a lot of time at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery  hanging around scientists and thinking about how they use their hands and how we use our hands when we are trying to figure something out or explain something.

Does being able to write out a problem by hand have some advantage over typing it onto a screen? What is it? How does it differ?

Says the Near-Sighted Monkey about her first day at WID:

“There are white boards and markers every which way you look on the upper floors of the WID building and they are often covered with what look like long dense sentences — I don’t even know what to call them. Are they formulas?  These sloping rows of hand-written shapes. They are beautiful.  Straightforward un-self conscious calligraphy—-  numbers over letters with tinier numbers next to them and then sudden epsilons and deltas and symbols I’ve never seen before like an equal sign drawn wiggly which I think means “pretty much equals”.

I could watch the people at WID draw their formulas out on white boards all day.

When I told one of the mathematicians I met how surprised I was to find people doing so much writing by hand, he told me he needs a pencil in his hand when he’s thinking. He said most of the mathematicians he knows are the same way. “

How can our hands help us think something out?

Filed under: use your hands

(Source: handdrawnbyhand)

Jul 23, 2012
Permalink
The disorder of the desk, the floor; the yellow Post-it notes everywhere; the whiteboards covered with scrawl: all this is the outward manifestation of the messiness of human thought.

Permalink

Writer’s Blocks

jndevereux:

This weekend my friend Austin and I were talking about writing, and I remembered an interview with Lawrence Weschler in The New New Journalism in which he talks about building with wooden blocks while he’s thinking about the structure of his articles or books. Here’s the passage, after he’s talked about his idea-gathering and information collecting:

Are there any activities that help at this point?
Two things. One is that I read a lot of novels. Writers like Larry McMurtry and Walter Mosley are especially good. I’m sort of like a bicyclist riding behind a truck: I want to get into the slipstream of that other narrator’s narrative. To get the feel of narrative, to be on the road, to remember what it feels like to tell a story.
The second thing I do is play with blocks. I have a very large collection of wooden blocks. Some of them are my own invention, and some of them are just rectangular.

These blocks belong to your daughter?
No, my daughter is not allowed to play with these blocks. They are mine.

And what do you do with these blocks?
Well, my wife, who is an important human rights monitor, and my daughter, who has been off at school, will come home and see the elaborate cathedral I’ve built on the kitchen table. And they’ll say, “We see you’ve been busy today.” And I have! Because although I’m not thinking about the material at all, I am thinking about structure and rhythm….

And how do these block structures get translated into writing?
I’ll be playing with my blocks and find myself thinking, “Hmm, I suppose if I put this part of the story in front of that rather than after it … That might be interesting.” And gradually I start to find formal issues of sequencing. Then I start to notice rhymes that I hadn’t noticed before.
For instance, when I was writing about Breytenbach there was a key moment in his story when he is being arrested at the airport and passes by a window in which he sees himself. I thought about what it might have been like to see himself at that moment. And then I remembered that in one of his poems he had a line about “South Africa is like the mirror at midnight when you looked in it and a train whistle blew in the distance, and your face was frozen there for all eternity, a horrible face but one’s own.” And I thought, hmm, if I put that quote next to that scene …
Now this gets really interesting. This is fun. And at a certain point everything flips around: I’m suddenly magnetized north rather than south, and everything else in the universe except the blank paper before me is north. I’m at my desk, and wouldn’t even notice if the house was burning down around me. And yet, I’m not interested in the material, I’m interested in the form. And the thing that is totally mind-blowing is that elements I put side by side for purely formal reasons turn out to be true about the real world. And this is because beauty is truth, and truth is beauty. It is the same kind of satisfaction that a mathematician gets out of an elegant proof.

Although the process sounds somewhat mysterious, and I’m not sure I would find it helpful in my writing, the important idea—that structuring writing is easier when you turn it into a physical activity—is undoubtedly true for me. I usually use index cards and shuffle them around, but using building blocks or Lego or even drawing a picture would probably work, too. The key is to get things out of your head and into your hands.

(All the interviews in that book are good, by the way, very focused on craft and would be of interest to any writer, not just journalists new new or old.)

Mar 24, 2012
Permalink
Fine art is that in which the hand, the head, and the heart of man go together.
John Ruskin, 1859, cf. Hockney (via)
Subscribe to my newsletter and get new art, writing, and interesting links delivered to your inbox every week.