TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "visualization"

Feb 16, 2013
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From Random Polygon to Ellipse

thenearsightedmonkey:


matthen:

Draw some random points on a piece of paper and join them up to make a random polygon. Find all the midpoints and connecting them up to give a new shape, and repeat. The resulting shape will get smaller and smaller, and will tend towards an ellipse!  [code] [more] [bigger version]

Dear Unthinkable Mind Class,
This looks like a picture of how a cohesive idea slowly makes itself present. It reminds me of how memories prompted by any random word will always generate a story once we focus on them.
Prof. O.S.


I filled at least half a dozen notebook pages on a plane recently trying to recreate this. Maybe the best illustration of how a book or a project comes together, too…

From Random Polygon to Ellipse

thenearsightedmonkey:

matthen:

Draw some random points on a piece of paper and join them up to make a random polygon. Find all the midpoints and connecting them up to give a new shape, and repeat. The resulting shape will get smaller and smaller, and will tend towards an ellipse!  [code] [more] [bigger version]

Dear Unthinkable Mind Class,

This looks like a picture of how a cohesive idea slowly makes itself present. It reminds me of how memories prompted by any random word will always generate a story once we focus on them.

Prof. O.S.

I filled at least half a dozen notebook pages on a plane recently trying to recreate this. Maybe the best illustration of how a book or a project comes together, too…

(via danchaon)

Aug 28, 2011
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Aug 26, 2011
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A page from John Cage’s “Aria”

Cage wanted the piece to be singable by any male or female vocalist, and he wanted them to freely choose 10 different singing styles that could be rapidly alternated.  Each style is represented by a different color and the shape of the squiggles indicates the general melodic contour.

Link: Scoring Outside the Lines - NYTimes.com

A page from John Cage’s “Aria”

Cage wanted the piece to be singable by any male or female vocalist, and he wanted them to freely choose 10 different singing styles that could be rapidly alternated. Each style is represented by a different color and the shape of the squiggles indicates the general melodic contour.

Link: Scoring Outside the Lines - NYTimes.com

Aug 11, 2011
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Analog Infoviz: Handmade Visualization Toolkit by Jose Duarte

@joseduarteq:

Using regular craft tools to bring data representation back into the real world

Fun idea. As I’ve said: “Most infographics online could be redrawn with a Sharpie on typing paper and say just as much.”

Analog Infoviz: Handmade Visualization Toolkit by Jose Duarte

@joseduarteq:

Using regular craft tools to bring data representation back into the real world

Fun idea. As I’ve said: “Most infographics online could be redrawn with a Sharpie on typing paper and say just as much.”

Apr 03, 2011
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The purpose of visualization is insight, not pictures.

Jan 16, 2011
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Drummer Gene Krupa performing at Gjon Mili’s studio. NYC, 1941

*Amazing* photographs from LIFE Magazine’s photo archives. Originally featured in the July 9th, 1941 article, “GENE KRUPA SHOWS HOW TO PLAY DRUM IN THESE FANTASTIC SOUND PICTURES.

In these unusual shots Krupa illustrates some rudiments of drumming. They were taken by Gjon Mili’s multiple-exposure camera so you could follow the track of Krupa’s drumsticks whizzing through the air. But they are interesting also as impressionistic portraits of sound, suggesting the rhythmic pandemonium of a Krupa jam session.

….As a drum historian, he likes to tell how Napoleon Bonaparte was once defeated by Russians who were roused to a fighting frenzy by Cossack drummers. Says Krupa proudly, “I have Cossack blood myself.”

Also, be sure to follow the LIFE Tumblr.

Nov 03, 2010
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Shakespeare’s Hamlet as a diagram by Helena Wahlman

I searched in vain for a view up close. Let me know if you find one. Thx, electronicalrattlebag!

Shakespeare’s Hamlet as a diagram by Helena Wahlman

I searched in vain for a view up close. Let me know if you find one. Thx, electronicalrattlebag!

Oct 28, 2010
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Medieval Arabic diagram of the visual system

Ibn al-Haytham (circa 1027, published in 1083). The oldest known drawing of the nervous system shows a large nose at the bottom, eyes on either side, and a hollow optic nerve that flows out of each one towards the back of the brain.

From a slideshow of images from Portraits of the Mind: Visualizing the Brain from Antiquity to the 21st Century (via)
Medieval Arabic diagram of the visual system
Ibn al-Haytham (circa 1027, published in 1083). The oldest known drawing of the nervous system shows a large nose at the bottom, eyes on either side, and a hollow optic nerve that flows out of each one towards the back of the brain.

From a slideshow of images from Portraits of the Mind: Visualizing the Brain from Antiquity to the 21st Century (via)

Oct 12, 2010
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Game Controller Family Tree by Steve Cable

Cable:

Whilst playing my Super Nintendo the other day I noticed there were a lot of similarities between it’s controller and the latest xbox 360 controller. I wondered how these interfaces, that so many people use, have developed over time. So I did a bit of research and created an infographic that illustrates the key design changes and innovation
Game Controller Family Tree by Steve Cable

Cable:

Whilst playing my Super Nintendo the other day I noticed there were a lot of similarities between it’s controller and the latest xbox 360 controller. I wondered how these interfaces, that so many people use, have developed over time. So I did a bit of research and created an infographic that illustrates the key design changes and innovation

Oct 01, 2010
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