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Posts tagged "work spaces"

Sep 02, 2014
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Mise en place for artists

Mise en place is a French cooking term that means “everything in place.” It’s used to refer to the way chefs will have all of their ingredients organized and ready to go before they start cooking. (Obviously, it’s an idea that applies to other types of work.)

Without mentioning it explicitly, cartoonist Kevin Huizenga explains why mise en place is important for artists:

Maybe you have a hard time getting to work because you really haven’t taken the time to figure out what materials you need, and you don’t have them ready-to-hand. They shouldn’t be “organized” in the sense of “visually organized.” One’s studio should be definitely be “messy,” but only in the sense that everything is where it’s most useful. If papers everywhere on the floor makes working easier right now, because you need to constantly refer to them, then they should stay there. So you need first to get the material conditions in place, before you can work.

Aug 29, 2014
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Jul 10, 2014
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Photographs of writers at work.

Note how many standing desks! See also a great book on the subject, The Writer’s Desk.

Filed under: work spaces

Jul 02, 2014
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Nick Cave’s office

From John Wray’s NYTimes profile:

Cave now lives in Brighton, England, with his wife and twin 14-year-old sons, in a residence that would have seemed, for a number of reasons, inconceivable to the scarecrow-haired punk he was back in Berlin. When I met him this winter, he was renting a modest office a short walk from his house, keeping regular office hours like a bona fide salaryman. (“I used to go six days a week, till I couldn’t stand it anymore,” Cave said with a grin. “Now I go Sundays as well.”)

Apart from a small upright piano off to one side, a microphone stand and a haphazard-looking collection of photos and pages torn from magazines pinned to the wall, the room itself could have passed for the office of a determinedly anachronistic clerk: a good-size desk, a manual typewriter and a well-used bottle of whiteout. His work ethic has long been legendary. While writing one of his best-known songs, “Red Right Hand,” from the 1994 album “Let Love In,” Cave filled an entire notebook with descriptions of the imaginary town the song was set in, including maps and sketches of prominent buildings, virtually none of which made it into the lyrics. “It’s good to have a place to go and just write,” Cave told me in Brighton. “I haven’t always had that luxury.”

Emphasis mine. Photo is a still from Cave’s new documentary, 20,000 Days On Earth.

Filed under: Nick Cave

Feb 21, 2014
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Maybe you want your back against the wall. Gunslinger style. Nothing can sneak up on you except your own bad sentences. Try it.
— Colson Whitehead on where to write

Feb 13, 2014
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thinkprocessnotproduct:

Saul Steinberg’s studio, 1959

Photographed by Inge Morath

Filed under: Saul Steinberg

thinkprocessnotproduct:

Saul Steinberg’s studio, 1959

Photographed by Inge Morath

Filed under: Saul Steinberg

Sep 03, 2013
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Ralph Steadman drawing and playing ukulele in his studio in Kent

Amazing video of one of my very favorite artists.

People have said, “Oh, I thought you’d be a nasty piece of work because you’re so dark and trenchant,” and I say, “No I’m not! I’ve got rid of it — it’s all on paper!”

On mistakes:

There’s no such thing as a mistake. A mistake is only an opportunity to do something else.

On style:

I never went out of my way to invent a style. I haven’t got a style — I just draw and it’s that way.

Basically who I want to be when I grow up…

(via @abstractsunday)

Aug 17, 2013
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May 04, 2013
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@drewtoothpaste scooped the nytimes by a week on this whole coworking thing

@drewtoothpaste scooped the nytimes by a week on this whole coworking thing

Feb 28, 2013
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Jill Krementz, The Writer’s Desk

@mattthomas:

I am a workspace voyeur — especially writer’s workspaces. My bible here is Jill Krementz’s The Writer’s Desk, a collection of wonderfully evocative photographs of, well, writer’s desks. In the introduction, John Updike writes, “I look at these photographs with a prurient interest, the way that I might look at the beds of notorious courtesans. Except that the beds would tell me less than these desks do. Here the intimacy of the literary act is caught in flagrante delicto: at these desks characters are spawned, plots are spun, imaginative distances are spanned.”

Filed under: my reading year 2013

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