TUMBLR

A scrapbook of stuff I'm reading / looking at / listening to / thinking about...



Posts tagged "you dont have to go to college"

Jan 12, 2014
Permalink
Today’s NYTimes quotes @joycecaroloates arguing that most great writers of the past would be rejected by today’s universities.

Today’s NYTimes quotes @joycecaroloates arguing that most great writers of the past would be rejected by today’s universities.

Oct 22, 2013
Permalink
No one should get an MFA if they have to pay for it…. To me, a writer is someone who writes. The best thing to me is to read eclectically, to go to readings, to have experiences, to live in the world, to mix with all different types of people, to take some chances, and to find some people and start a writing group.

Oct 11, 2013
Permalink
“Should I go to grad school?” flowchart by Matt Thomas

Filed under: you dont have to go to college

“Should I go to grad school?” flowchart by Matt Thomas

Filed under: you dont have to go to college

Jun 11, 2013
Permalink
jaysonscottmusson:

The most succinct thing I’ve ever read about grad school.

From pictures for sad children

jaysonscottmusson:

The most succinct thing I’ve ever read about grad school.

From pictures for sad children

Apr 05, 2013
Permalink
Kio Stark, Don’t Go Back To School

I was really thrilled to read Kio’s book before it came out — if you follow my “you dont have to go to college” tag you know this is a subject near and dear to me. Here’s my blurb from the inside cover:


  Not going to graduate school felt like a failure at the time, but wound up being the best choice I ever made. It set me out on a path of self-learning and discovery that led me to work I love, work that would’ve never flown in an academic setting. How I wish I’d had Kio’s book as a guide to help me along the way!


Over and over in the interviews with independent learners, what struck me was the importance of publicly sharing and teaching what you’re learning:


  You need to create a feedback loop that confirms your work is worth it and keeps you moving forward. In school this is provided by advancing through the steps of the linear path within an individual class or a set curriculum, as well as from feedback in the form of grades and praise. Outside of school, people I talked to got their sense of competence from many sources. Many reported to me that they often turn around and teach what they’ve learned to others as soon as they’ve learned it. This gives them a sense of mastery and deepens their understanding. When their learning is structured around a specific project, successful completion and functioning of the project proves their progress. Projects can include making a computer program, constructing a book, making a film, writing about an unfamiliar topic, starting a business, or learning a skill. Projects give you a goal for learning skills and abstract information alike, and contribute to gaining a sense of mastery and competence as you complete them.  


For me, blogging was basically my graduate school.

You can get the eBook from Kio’s site.

Kio Stark, Don’t Go Back To School

I was really thrilled to read Kio’s book before it came out — if you follow my “you dont have to go to college” tag you know this is a subject near and dear to me. Here’s my blurb from the inside cover:

Not going to graduate school felt like a failure at the time, but wound up being the best choice I ever made. It set me out on a path of self-learning and discovery that led me to work I love, work that would’ve never flown in an academic setting. How I wish I’d had Kio’s book as a guide to help me along the way!

Over and over in the interviews with independent learners, what struck me was the importance of publicly sharing and teaching what you’re learning:

You need to create a feedback loop that confirms your work is worth it and keeps you moving forward. In school this is provided by advancing through the steps of the linear path within an individual class or a set curriculum, as well as from feedback in the form of grades and praise. Outside of school, people I talked to got their sense of competence from many sources. Many reported to me that they often turn around and teach what they’ve learned to others as soon as they’ve learned it. This gives them a sense of mastery and deepens their understanding. When their learning is structured around a specific project, successful completion and functioning of the project proves their progress. Projects can include making a computer program, constructing a book, making a film, writing about an unfamiliar topic, starting a business, or learning a skill. Projects give you a goal for learning skills and abstract information alike, and contribute to gaining a sense of mastery and competence as you complete them.  

For me, blogging was basically my graduate school.

You can get the eBook from Kio’s site.

Apr 03, 2013
Permalink
Jessica Hagy on student debt. (Her new book, How To Be Interesting, is out.)

Filed under: YDHTGTC

Jessica Hagy on student debt. (Her new book, How To Be Interesting, is out.)

Filed under: YDHTGTC

Mar 31, 2013
Permalink

Dec 05, 2012
Permalink

Oct 04, 2012
Permalink
MFA vs. MBA chart from William Powhida’s Why Are Artists Poor?

MFA vs. MBA chart from William Powhida’s Why Are Artists Poor?

Sep 23, 2012
Permalink
Got my MFA on DVD framed…

Got my MFA on DVD framed…

Subscribe to my newsletter and get new art, writing, and interesting links delivered to your inbox every week.